Northridge


Northridge is a community in the San Fernando Valley region of the City of Los Angeles, California, United States.

The 1994 Northridge earthquake is named for the community based on early estimates of the location of the quake’s epicenter; however further refinements showed it to be technically in neighboring Reseda. The area was also heavily damaged in the 1971 Sylmar earthquake. In 1994, the Northridge Little League Baseball team won the United States Little League Championship game, but lost the World Series game to the international team from Coquivacoa-Maracaibo, Venezuela. The U.S. Metric Association is based in Northridge.

The community was founded in 1910 as Zelzah station, a Southern Pacific depot town at the Colonel Henry Hubbard & “Bud” Wright Hawk Ranch north of Los Angeles.

Shortly after the Los Angeles City Aqueduct opened in 1913, Henry Hubbard became a member of Aqueduct Board. The following year Zelzah Grammar School opened and citizens formally voted for annexation to the City of Los Angeles and Owens River water rights in 1915. William Mulholland, engineer of the mammoth project, lived nearby and maintained one of many large rancho tracts remaining from the Spanish, Mexican and Californio land grant days.

Zelzah Acres became the name of one of those early housing tracts carved from the former enormous Rancho Ex-Mission San Fernando lands joining nearby towns of Chatsworth Park, Lankershim, Owensmouth, San Fernando and Van Nuys. The post office and train depot were renamed North Los Angeles in 1929 and finally Northridge in 1938.